AirVenture's Campground Opens Today, Take a One Minute Time-Lapse Tour

  • Jun 25, 2015 10:19pm GMT
  • 241 views

EAA AirVenture doesn't start for another three weeks, but Camp Scholler, the EAA's official campground, opened its gates today.

Home to over 30,000 campers each year, Camp Scholler is one of the best way to fully experience the airshow known as "Oshkosh." Most casual AirVenture attendees won't even notice the large campground located on the southwest corner of the airfield. But the ones who stay there wouldn't dream of attending the show in any other way.

Camp Scholler is a unique campground. It is over one mile long and made up of 61 streets and 5 avenues. There are two general stores, five shower houses, and a laundry service. You can even receive mail at your campsite. A bus service runs continuously to help move people around. And although the vast majority of the campground is primitive with no electric or water hookups, there is wi-fi and it's free.

Those that arrive early can take advantage of the campground's "first come, first serve" policy and reserve the exact spot they want. Some want to be close to the flight line while others want that shady spot in the woods. Large groups like to come early to have a better chance of reserving multiple camp sites in one area.

I'll be making the trek to Oshkosh in a few days to rope out my campsite. For me, the campground at AirVenture brings out what is the true essence of the EAA, and that is the people. Some of the best experiences and stories have happened around that campfire with some great friends, most of whom I only see for these few days out of the year.

Below is a time-lapse video tour of Camp Scholler on one its fullest days. They say the campground has never reached capacity, but in this year it got close. You can see in this video the different neighborhoods, camping units, and overall size of the campground. I started near the furthest camping unit in the southwest corner and ended at the main admission gate. A total number of 1328 images were shot over a distance of 3.1 miles.